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(FT4) Panasonic GF1 pictures?

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I Just came back from  my Jungle trip in Australia and saw this images inside the xitek forum. The post has been deleted after few hours. This is not the first possible GF1 image we saw (click here to see the GL1 rumored image and specs). Xitek leaked images are normally good so maybe this could be a real one?

UPDATE: One of our most known sources says the camera is real! The camera should be unveiled right in time for the IFA in Berlin! We upgraded the rumor value from FT2 to FT4.

UPDTAE2: Sorry for beeing 2 days late in posting the news. All three of us were outside for work and without any Internet connection. Thanks to all who sent us an email with the links to the xitek forum!

 

gf1_2gf1_3

gf1_1
The same xitek post said that the MFT camera will be released together with the 20mm and 45mm lens.
gf1_lens

UPDATE:
Rumored specs
Internal pop-up flash similar to LX3
HD Movie 720P 30fps
Supersonic anti-dust
Aspect Ratio: 4:3, 3:2, 16:9, 1:1
Total pixel: 13.1mp
Effective pixel: 12.1mp
Shutter: 1/4000 – 60s, B: about 4 min.
LCD: 3″, 460,000 dots
Size: 119 x 71 x 36.3mm
Weight: 285g (not sure if battery is included)

via: photorumors.com

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  • Joachim

    Where is number 24?
    The contacts below the hot shoe may be for an external EVF?
    Or for an external optical viewfinder with focus indicator and frames for 20 and 45 mm focal length?

  • Mike

    Rumored GF1 completely looks like LX-3 (or D LUX 4 if you will) but with interchangeable lenses (wich is great). Hope there will be external (if not built-in) optical view finder with essential photographic informations like Joachim wrote. I little woried about motion picture button (on picture 33) because it seems like it can be accidentally pressed due to close position from the shutter button. At last a black coloured body :).
    Great work 43rumors, keep going (notice: where is recent comments box?).

  • misu

    how about a no-shutter, completely silent camera? could this be it? would you be interested?

  • Mike

    @misu: yes, no-shutter could it be and it’s called ‘electronic shutter’. Every motion picture camera it has (so GF1 in the video mode has this shutter too) – in fact mechanical shutter will be damaged in a short time when you take motion pictures with it.
    But there is technical reason to use a mechanical shutter when taking photos – when it takes data from all sensor cells (e.g.12 Mpix) after exposition, the sensor must be covered by the mechanical shutter to prevent light impact in this critical moment. With the electronic shutter some sensor cells work as data canals and this decrease sensor resolution necessarily (so that’s why 12Mpix sensor produces ‘just’ HD ready or Full HD resolution videos and yes, it is video standard too).
    If mechanical shutter sound is quiet enough I’m good with that.

  • misu

    mike, thanks for sharing your knowledge!
    problem is that cameras such as Sony f35(f23), f900, red one (using both cmos and ccd) do not use mechanical shutters, but still the image quality is great; so there is no need for mechanical shutter, but probably you have to compensate via electronics.
    as for cells working as data canals you should go more in to detail with that; as far as I know that is available only for old ccd sensors (producing smear) while newer FT and IT ccd sensors, and cmos, go around that, reading the charge in a different manner.
    using “mos” sensor panasonic could easily window the sensor for any format that fits in to the sensor area to produce “full hd” video image. this colud even be a way to match different standards (2/3,1/2,1/3, 16,s16,4/3, 1:1.85, 1:1.66, 1:1.375, 1:2, etc) and optimizing use of AA filter.
    in the environment that I have to work in a small sound proof camera is a must, and using a huge Jacobson blimp is not an option; I expect there are many professionals that would change heavy Canon/Nikon gear just for that and a decent image quality.
    please go in to details on the “some sensor cells work as data canals” problem.

  • Mike

    @misu: yes, you are totally right, only CCDs* (obsolete “data canals” issue) have problems with electronic shutter – it produces smearing caused by interlaced mode (and serious blooming can be visible). Since Olympus and Panasonic are using Live MOS image sensors in their DSLRs and MFT cameras, this is not a problem anymore. But both companies still use mechanical shutter so there must be a reason: GH1, G1 and EP-1 all of these are produced with mechanical shutter. Why? I don’t know… maybe these non-mechanical-shutter-cameras last out for the ages (electronic shutter is virtual part and cannot be damaged by taking photos) and consumer companies like Olympus or Panasonic don’t want this (maybe Leica does). But future is mechanical shutter free for sure :).

    Notice:
    Type of shutter doesn’t matter. Image matters.
    * for more go on: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1021&message=28467640

  • Mike

    @misu: “…in the environment that I have to work in a small sound proof camera is a must…” Olympus EP-1 produces quiter shutter sound than Leica M4.
    Judge by yourself at: http://www.imaginginsider.com/?p=96492

  • Mike

    @misu: if you want to learn more about shutters:
    http://dvxuser.com/jason/CMOS-CCD/
    http://www.isgchips.com/pdf/Shutter_Operations_Kodak_App_Note.pdf
    CMOS with global shutter seems like way to go.

  • Edvian

    Re mechanical shutter:
    CCDs can transfer the charge from the light sensitive photosites to a non-sensitive storage at the end of exposure, then the charges can be read out slowly for A/D conversion.
    CMOS sensors have no such possibility, so light must be cut off mechanically at the end of exposure. The charges are then read out slowly for A/D conversion.
    Video recording with CMOS sensors use a “rolling shutter” where row by row of pixels are cleared, then read out later. The top of the picture is captured 1/30 second after the bottom, making “jello” effects possible if you move the camera fast in the mean time.

  • Mike

    @Edvian: thanks for the explanation about CCD sensors, that is what I thought. Now is clearly obvious why MOS sensors have mechanical shutters like the E-P1 and so on.

  • chris

    Could that lens find its way onto an LX3?

  • “month”

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