Some more Canon Mirrorless vs Micro Four Thirds news from sources…

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I had the chance to talk with some sources about the new Canon Mirrorless camera. With the launch of the Canon mirrorless we now have a full and final view of the mirrorless system. The sources once again confirmed that Canon has chosen an APS-C sized sensor. Canon didn’t want to give any kind of advantage to Sony. Apparently they fear Sony more than m43!

The sources also told us that the first camera feels a bit cheap in your hands. And according to them it’s not a m43 killer camera. Quite the opposite. The NEX cameras are still better in doing competition to m43 cameras. Overalla Nikon and Canon had a very cautious way of entering the mirrorless world. One more thing: A more advanced Canon (and Nikon) camera will arrive in a few months only.

But that’s just a first impression based on my sources. Let’s see on Monday if the Canon system is something interesting or not. Follow the full news coverage on MirrorlessRumors or CanonWatch!!!

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  • Yes I agree, it looks a very conservative first step into the mirrorless market, which is not so wise when you are late to the party. Still it looks interesting basically because it might be the only good alternative to m4/3 once it releases higher end bodies and more lenses (to be honest, I find NEX to be a flawed system, Samsung is not too bad, but not too good either, Nikon has the small sensor – and for now slow lenses- limitation and Fuji is just for a selected few. So Canon might turn out to be the only good system to compete with m4/3… but from next year only).

  • Well, the NEX advantage over m43 cameras is the just very sligtly better image quality. In all other aspects the E–M5/G5 are far better than any other NEX cameras.

  • Admin,
    Without logging in, user will get a 502 gateway error at all rumour pages. You might want to fix that, at least with a better and more instructive page. Maybe redirect user to a signin or sign up page. But I think is better to just open the page and only request user to signin for commenting. Depending on your priority; signup count or visitor count.

    Anyway, I don’t like Canon, still like Olympus. If Olympus is no longer in Camara business, I will stick Olympus logo to whatever camera I will use. I am that type of person. :D

  • Ad

    This camera would open up the way to using a Canon 17mm T/S on a mirrorless camera. Great!

  • ozymandias

    ad, no it wont, no more than an adapter would open the way

    • Ad

      Indeed I didn’t mention that, but I assume an EF(-S) adapter will become available with electronic signals relay so that the T/S 17mm can be used. Canon has quite a line-up of EF and EF-S lenses so I’d venture a guess that they will introduce an adapter next Monday as well.

  • > Canon didn’t want to give any kind of advantage to Sony. Apparently they fear Sony more than m43!

    I do not think it is really about Sony.

    With all the FF mirrorless moaning, they simply hasn’t dared to go smaller than existing competition.

    > Overall Nikon and Canon had a very cautious way of entering the mirrorless world.

    Nikon – yes. Small sensor, large lenses, high price – Nikon1 was designed to be a niche product.

    Canon, with APS-C sized sensor, with new mount – looks much more more serious. Cheapness of the first body highlights that they are after mass market.

  • as I said on PetaPixel …

    if this has been ‘leaked’ then the quality of some of the pics suggests to me that it was canon themselves … if it is, then they are too late for the party

    if it is an aps-c sized sensor, then the 22mm = 35mm (FF) I think I will stick with my 3/4 GF2 with the 14mm and wait for a low cost canon full-frame DSLR (I have some good EF lenses inc the Tamron 90mm macro)

    PS personally I don’t think much of the sony nex system, after having one in my hands (can’t remember which one) I felt the body was too light and the lens was too heavy i.e. the centre of balance was totally wrong

  • clau

    I tend to think this hesitant approach to mirror less afflicts all manufacturers juggling multiple lens mounts. The test in the proverbial pudding is not how many bodies they put out but how committed they are to building a system of proprietary lenses and accessories around that body. Such forays into new areas must takes away valuable resources such as production capacity, inventories or the budget for advertising and marketing from existing (and proven) systems. DSLRs will remain the mainstay of these manufacturers and I expect the lack of commitment to continue. Only manufacturers like Pany who have 100% commitment mirror less crow publicly about the ascendancy of CSCs over DSLRs.

  • yeahi

    I’m sure it’s not a APS-C sensor after i overlay EM-5 & NEX 7 over the canon. It’s a little bigger than M43, but alot smaller than NEX. I believed the sensor size will be the same as G1X.

    At crop factor of 1.85, the 22mm lens will be 40.7mm equivalent.

    • But does it look like 4:3 ratio or 3:2? If it’s the former, then sure it’s the one from the G1X, but otherwise it should be the standard Canon APS-C (which is a bit smaller than from other manufacturers).

  • Gabriel

    My two cents
    same aps-c sensor than the latest 650D, same tactile screen, maybe tilt screen. i hope mic input and price around 800$ or less, Canon can resuse their sensor, screen and digic processor to cut the price if they want to.

  • It’s interesting that Canon opted to not have a built-in flash but have a hotshoe instead, just like (most of) the Olympus m4/3 bodies. Too bad there doesn’t seem to be a way to optionally put an EVF. If not for the bigger sensor, it doesn’t seem any better than an E-PM1. That is, it has no articulated screen, has minimal controls, has a non-touch sensitive screen (?), etc. At least the E-PM1 is small, cheap and has an accessory port. But it seems that the mount seems big enough for an FF sensor.

  • ljmac

    This system seems to be a carbon copy of NEX, with all the same problems: overly large zoom lenses for the bodies (see Mirrorless Rumours for pics of the first standard zoom), and a registration distance that’s too short for the sensor size, making wide angle zooms in particular very difficult to design (note that NEX still doesn’t have any planned).

    • Anonymous

      As long as they launch some primes, they will do better than Sony.

  • Renato S.

    I like this type of design.

    Canon has been pretty disappointing lately, they are getting more and more conservative trying not to “cannibalize” themselves and letting the others eat them bit by bit, it doesn’t make sense.

    They cropped the 5DMKIII so it wouldn’t hurt their C Cinema cameras, they are going very conservative again on mirrorless market so it doesn’t hurt their entry-level DSLR. They will pay for all of that ultra conservadorism.

    • Alex

      I think you don’t understand lens design. The SHORTER the flange distance is, the easier it is to design wide angle lenses. This makes it even more mysterious why on earth Sony hasn’t managed to design good ones, yet. After all, you can always increase the distance.

      Just FYI – on M43 the flange distance is 20mm. It’s hard to get any closer since you still need to leave space for the shutter. Sony actually did a terrific job at designing their mount and cameras since their distance is even lower – 18mm which makes it the smallest in the industry. On most SLRs it is about 40mm as you need to leave space for the mirror which has to flip up and that by itself already takes at least 25mm for the mirror alone. In fact, this is the big problem when Canon designed their EOS system as they increased their flange distance from their manual focus mount. This made all previous lenses useless without optical adapters. Nikon got it right by keeping the same distance.

      So why does the flange distance matter? It is roughly corresponds to the minimum focal length up to which you can use a simple Tessar design for lenses. That’s the reason why 50mm f/1.8 or f/1.4 lenses are very cheap and 35mm f/1.4 lenses are ridiculously expensive for regular SLRs. On the other hand, for M43 a 20mm f/1.7 is quite cheap due to the lower flange distance. Below that you need a different lens design, hence the 14mm f/2.5 and corresponding cheaper full frame lenses. Obviously, for telephoto this doesn’t help much. The focal length ultimately determines the length of the lens.

      • Form what I understand in the lens design, it is indeed easier to develop the smaller wide lenses for the shorter flange distance, but it is more difficult to make them uniformly sharp (from center to edge) at the same time, since approaching the sensor will make noticeable the change in the curvature of the lens over the sensor field.
        Anyways, for a particular optical scheme there is an optimum of the sharpness as as function of flange distance and the lens size and seems M43 caught it on its ultra wide-angle lenses without much sacrificing the size.

  • napalm

    based on this pic and assuming the body aint huge, it does look like an APS-C sensor

    • napalm

      correction: does not look like an APS-C sensor

    • “Anyways, for a particular optical scheme there is an optimum of the sharpness as as function of flange distance and the lens size and seems M43 caught it on its ultra wide-angle lenses without much sacrificing the size.”

      Forget to add the sensor size (-> drop in the center-edge resolution) to the equation, of course.

    • Forgot to include the sensor size into the equation, of course.

  • Camaman

    I agree the sensor doesn’t look that big to me.

    Can someone compare the sensor size and hotshoe dimensions based on this pic?

    • Jon R

      The 18-55 kit lens probably indicates an aps-c sized sensor.

      • napalm

        if the kit lens is internal focusing, it may explain the size

        • It’s not so much the size as the focal length that reveals the sensor has indeed an APS-C size.

    • From the picture above I measure the hotshoe and the sensor and compare it to a real hotshot. I makes the sensor is 23 mm wide, so the sensor size is APS-C for sure. (Canon APS-C is 22,3 x 14,9 mm)

    • The sensor looks small for the mount size, but we don’t know how big that is either. In any case, it seems that maybe the mount is designed to be able to use a bigger sensor too. Maybe like Sony, Canon also wants to future proof the mount for a day when they might decide to make a full frame version too.

      In any case, the sensor looks like 3:2 to me, so it must be the standard Canon APS-C. It wouldn’t make sense to make a new one a bit smaller (for the G1X they just cut the sides of it to make it 4:3).

  • JesperMP

    No EVF, fixed LCD, appearantly not possible to attach external EVF, puny grip, very few direct controls.
    And the looks are blah.
    Not really impressed with this.

    • Anonymous

      If it doesn’t have a VF…it is a point & shoot camera…straight up..not a serious imaging device.
      I have a Canon FF Which is an incredible system…but this Canon offering makes me thrilled that I invested so heavily in MFT for a micro alternative system to the FF beast..This Canon M brings nothing to the table for this photographer. Offerings like the new Oly 75mm and the IBIS in the OM-D are plushing the MFT “system” out. It will only get better.

    • Bob B.

      If it doesn’t have a VF…it is a point & shoot camera…straight up..not a serious imaging device.
      I have a Canon FF Which is an incredible system…but this Canon offering makes me thrilled that I invested so heavily in MFT for a micro alternative system to the FF beast..This Canon M brings nothing to the table for this photographer. Offerings like the new Oly 75mm and the IBIS in the OM-D are plushing the MFT “system” out. It will only get better.

      • Esa Tuunanen

        Canon clearly wants just to take moneys of those seeing only Canon name instead of offering true DSLR replacing mirrorless because they can still keep milking that old cow.

        Now would be good time for m4/3 to offer actual high end bodies capable to competing in controls/ergonomics against higher end DSLRs like 60D/7D.
        In lower end m4/3 already has plenty of diversity with Olympus hopefully now calming down in random features interating of PENs and Panasonic having GF/GX for compact and G serie.

  • JesperMP

    At the base of the 18-55 mm lens, it looks as if it says “image stabiliser”.
    Which means that the new mirrorless does not have IBIS, and no OIS for the smaller primes. Another small disappointment.
    If it gets the same sensor as 650D, then it will have a pretty good sensor, but apart from that I find little to be excited about.

    • Anonymous

      In body stabilisation might be well patented by Olympus, Pentax and Minolta-Sony and Canon no doubt doesn’t want to pay to others.
      Also corporation world has wide spread Not Invented Here syndrome.

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