UPDATED: Panasonic GF2 preview at Systemkamerforum (+ more GF2 news)

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Hands-on at Systemkamera-forum.de. You need to be registered to download the pdf file. The most important news is that „ Mein persönliches Fazit nach einigen Stun- den und mehr als 200 Bildern mit der LUMIX GF2: Ich vermisse Tasten und das Modusrad in keiner Weise – mit erweiterter Touchscreen- Bedienung und Quickmenu hat Panasonic einen vollwertigen Ersatz geschaffen.“ Translated… “I don’t miss the buttons and wheel they removed from the GF1, the touchscreen works very well.

Meanhwile ThePhoBlographer gives you “7 Reasons Why I’m Not Buying the Panasonic GF-2“. Hmmm…do you agree with all his critiques?

And finally there is a Panasonic GF2 preview at Imaging Resource.

UPDATE: Photoradar posted ISO-charts results.

GF2 shop links (preorders available on Amazon UK only):
Amazon US, BHphoto, Amazon UK

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  • Boris

    The best looking mirror-less camera, to my eyes at least!

    • Looks good indeed, but who cares? This camera is a big step down from GF1 as you don’t have 2nd curtain sync, no flash exp. correction, and yes, there are no dials at all.

      • Zorg

        It has a dial. Or a “wheel”, if you prefer.
        It doesn’t have a Mode Dial, which is irrelevant 90% of the time when one uses Aperture- or Shutter Speed-Priority.
        For the 10% time left, that is when one is in too much of a hurry to adjust A or S, there is iA button on the way to the shutter release, faster to press in a rush than turning a dial to an exact position.
        So a dial to adjust A- or S-Priority, and a button to get Full Automatic in a rush; what one would need a Mode Dial for?

        • I use the mode dial to choose between Cx modes very frequently. This is my style, you may shoot in a different way.

        • tgutgu

          I have no clue, why so many people constantly insist that mode dials are irrelevant and completely deny that directo controls are faster to operate.

          • zorg

            Direct controls to parameters one uses are the best. But direct controls to parameters one doesn’t use are missed ergonomics and a waste of time on the way to catch a moment.

            The usual pattern for most amateurs is to use one semi-automatic program (A or S) most of the time, full-automatic (iA) when they’re in a rush, and full-manual (M) in some specific cases when time allows. In other words, they need to easily change aperture (or shutter speed, respectively) most of the time, and have a very rapid access to full-automatic to capture a moment on the fly — as long as this pattern is as easy as possible, most amateurs will be OK. And as far as I can see, the GF2 allows for this pattern quite easily.

            As Miklos Rabi said, different photographers have different habits, partially or fully outside this very general usage pattern. So eventually, the best ergonomics are ergonomics that one can tune to its own usage. The GF2 seems to allow further customization than any other camera before it.

            There’s one obvious drawback: absence of mechanical feedback, and one potential show-stopper: possible bad user interface. How strong these issues will be? Wait and see… For now, they are unknown, so why bashing the GF2 on ergonomics? So far, it can only be hypothesized that, with the crazy number of buttons that can be displayed on a screen, direct controls might not be an area where the GF2 is lacking (although people on the web claim the opposite because they don’t SEE any button on the body shell itself).

            The GF2 rests heavily on the use of touch interface. It’s a new paradigm in camera ergonomics — a paradigm where counting the number of external buttons doesn’t preclude of the number of direct controls available to the photographer. Whereas this is a good or a bad paradigm, I’m not sure — but I’m looking forward to see through reviews and my own hand-on if Panasonic implemented the touch-interface well enough for the ergonomics to enhance pleasure, or badly enough to stand on the way between the photographer and his/her vision.

            All in all, judging a totally new approach to camera ergonomics just on pictures of a body that is not even available yet is kind of weird. So I prefer to speak about tech spec, which are available. For instance, I understand that Panasonic wants to keep the top-end sensor for the GH2, but it’s a pity they didn’t bring GH1’s sensor to the GF2. I would have bought it in a blink!

      • Zorg

        For 2nd curtain sync.:
        If I remember correctly, Panasonic has 2nd curtain as default for some cameras (instead of 1st curtain like everybody else). If that is the case in the GF2, I don’t see the problem (admittedly, I never understood how 1st curtain is useful). So wait and see before bashing, please…

        For flash exp. correction:
        The internal flash is so small that adjusting it doesn’t make a huge difference in practice. For external flashes, most of them can be adjusted by their own, and it’s easier than going through a menu on the camera.

  • Dummy00001

    > do you agree with all his critiques?

    Pointed at the GF2 – not really. It’s not that Pannay is replacing G/GH series with the GF completely. It’s just more choice for customers == good.

    But the opinion piece is IMO biased/skewed. The “4/3rds and Micro 4/3rds Sensors Still Have to Catch Up” followed by “The Sony NEX-5 Has Amazing High ISOs”. He praises the even smaller NEX-5 for the sensor while in GF2 opinion concentrating pretty much completely on bashing its size. And no complain about NEX UI? WTF?? How better high ISO performance is going to help, if the fleeting moments are all gone – while user was digging through the endless NEX menus???

    IMO, the opinion piece is theorizing too much. Without real world test it is rather baseless and uninformed. Quote: “I admittedly haven’t had any time with it”. That should have been followed by “The End,” but no, authors went on with rants anyway.

    P.S. And ZOMG when they would stop complaining about the high ISOs??? It seems the people always need something (measurable) to complain about. Regardless of the relevance.

    • You’re absolutely right!
      People always complains no matter what! It is stupid. There always be something better here or there. Actually I use G1, it has no good low light performance in any case. But it is not a problem for me at all. I take a lot of pictures and people like them a lot – no one said – “ooh there is too much noise” or something like that. I have never hear anything about noise – not even once. High ISO performance is not so important when one can’t frame picture properly. What I miss now is video in my camera, because I want to have all in one equipment and sell and forget about my handycam 🙂
      I’m wondering now whether to buy GF2 or GH2… that’s my dilemma 🙂 Full range of features vs really small dimensions that I can carry it everywhere and every time with me.
      Now I’m really so happy with G1 that maybe I buy both… who knows… 🙂

      greetings to all great photographers here :-)!

      • Zorg

        “I have never heard anything about noise” — good one 😀

    • > while user was digging through the endless NEX menus???

      After latest firmware update, NEX menus are much better. Even dpreview changed their conclusions on NEX’es because of this.

      I agree this “review” is moot, but there are some facts.

      – The price for GF2 is ridiculously high (more than double the price of NEX3+better/similar wide lens)
      – Pananonic doesn’t want to use a better sensor only for marketing purposes (see http://www.dslrmagazine.com/digital/tecnicas-de-fotografia-digital/charla-con-panasonic.html google translate if you can’t read Spanish) – I’d argue they are plain dumb.

      Sony has clearly an edge in price, size and IQ (they might have some other cons, but price, size and IQ are big pros), and panasonic don’t care??? WTF!

  • beware this is a commercial consumer product that is being “commercialized”.

  • Sorry sisters but Photoradar’s ISO charts are the perfect example why woman shouldn’t review camera’s,
    B&W high ISO charts??? common…

    • safaridon

      If you look DPRs resolution charts use the same B&W target or lettering don’t they?

    • Aaron

      “Sorry sisters but Photoradar’s ISO charts are the perfect example why woman shouldn’t review camera’s,”

      And your sentence grammar shows why you shouldn’t write comments.

  • safaridon

    Just take a look at Photoradars initial resolution tests on production GF2 with 14/2.5 lens, looks very impressive. JPEGs now 2400 lines resolution at ISO 100 and 2200 lines all the way from ISO 200 out to ISO 6400! Resolution is resolution and retained detail so the new processing engine used must be doing a very good job handling noise with JPEGs. Resolutions with RAW likely to be even higher.

  • Tim

    Does anyone think it is likely that in the future Panasonic will start integrating GPS features (like with the ZS7) into consumer micro four thirds cameras like the GF series? I was hoping the GF2 would include this feature.

  • Brod1er

    Some like mode dials others don’t. The issue is that one could have been included without much fuss – lots of room on the top…..

    Maybe P wanted to keep it simple. Maybe they wanted to keep cost down. Maybe they are saving a dial for the GF3. maybe all the above. The question is whether the GF3 will be larger with an EVF or the same size with mode dial but no EVF.

  • He starts his “review” by saying he hasn’t even used the camera. Pointless conjecture, all of it; just fishing for hits. Which, like fools, we have given him.

    And lest we forget, the GF1 continues. So what a lot of crap about nothing.

    • growers

      I read the first sentence about how he hadn’t actually tried the GF2 and immediately stopped reading. Left a comment on his site to that affect which got deleted. What a twonk.

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