New Polaroid mirrorless camera can take MFT lenses (with adapter).

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Update: hands-on video at engadget.

It's common in our Micro Four Thirds world to use third party lenses on MFT camera via the use of adapters. But what about using MFT lenses on other cameras? Polaroid just did that, a new mirrorless camera that is compatible with MFT lenses with the use of an adapter. I am wondering why they didn't make it with native MFT mount. There is little info about the camera now:

18 megapixel, 1080p video, Android OS, 3.5 inch display, pop-up flashand $399 price with a 10-30mm lens included.

 

via Engadget, Mashable.

 

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Update: Download Adobe Creative Suite 2 For Free

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Update3: This comes from imaging-resource:

Here’s what Issacs wrote on Adobe’s community forum following the reports.

“On behalf of Adobe Systems Incorporated …

You have heard wrong! Adobe is absolutely not providing free copies of CS2!

What is true is that Adobe is terminating the activation servers for CS2 and that for existing licensed users of CS2 who need to reinstall their software, copies of CS2 that don’t require activation but do require valid serial numbers are available. (Special serial numbers are provided on the page for each product download.) See <http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1114930>.

Update2: the download link appears to be still alive. Just tried it out. Don’t know what is going on.

Update: To good to be true! According to diyphotography, which cites Adobe support forum, the download was never meant to be free. The download page was meant for photographers who bought CS2, but needed to reactivate it. The download link has now been disabled.

 

Adobe’s CS2 suite can be downloaded for free. Click here to download. Serial numbers are provided with the download links. You have to be registered to Adobe (it’s free) to make the download. Mac (PowerPc) and Windows versions.

[via 9to5toys via nachbelichtet.de via canonwatch]

 

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Olympus OM-D EM-5 Review By Scott Bourne (and refurbished E-M5 deal)

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Scott Bourne, who recently sold all of his professional Canon gear and switched to Micro Four Thirds (see what is in his bag now) wrote a long term review of the Olympus OM-D E-M5 camera (refurbished here for $829). He started using the E-M5 because “[he] wanted a light-weight, low-profile, small, compact camera system that is easy to carry and provides professional-quality images“. What about the image quality? Scott writes:

But what about image quality? Can that small sensor deliver professional images? Absolutely! As long as the camera is operated by someone who knows how to properly use it.

There are obviously also some drwabacks. Mainly…:

I can’t shoot in pre-dawn light and expect the same results I got from a Canon 5D MK III. These smaller sensors suffer when there’s low light. So I simply wait for good light or make my own. The biggest difference for me is in the lack of ability to capture moving subjects. The Canon 1DX has the best autofocus in the world. It can track anything in almost any light, going fast or slow, near or far, coming at you or flying by. The Olympus cannot. The OM-D EM-5 is pretty good at panning subjects. It’s amazing at static objects. The AF on a static object is as fast as there is. Once you try to shoot moving objects the Olympus (and all other MFT cameras I’ve tried) stumbles.

But then…:

One big advantage of the MFT cameras and the Olympus system specifically is the quality of the primes. The very fast, 12mm, 45mm and 75mm Zuiko lenses are spectacular. They are as sharp as anything I’ve used ever. Especially the 75. It may be the sharpest lens I’ve ever tested. With an effective focal length (EFL) of 150mm at f/1.8, it would be an impossible lens to get for a big full-frame DSLR. So here the trade-off is in the plus column. The glass is fast, sharp, contrasty and incredibly reliable.

Scott Bourne sums up the pros and cons of the E-M5 (and the MFT system in general) as follows:

The biggest pros to using the MFT system

1. Stealth
2. Small size
3. Low weight
4. Easy to pack and carry
5. Amazing glass
6. Lower overall cost
7. Options not available to DSLR users

The biggest cons to using the MFT system

1. Low-light performance isn’t as good as DSLR
2. AF on moving subjects is sub-par
3. Can’t tether
4. Short battery life
5. Minimal support system

Read Scott Bourne’s review here, sample images are provided.

More Olympus OM-D E-M5 deals on Amazon clicking here.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 price check: [shopcountry 29074]

Shot with the E-M5 – Image credit: Scott Bourne
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List of new Panasonic and Olympus compact cameras.

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So here we are with the full list of compact cameras to be announced on Monday by Panasonic and Olympus:

Olympus:

  • SH-50MR: 16MP, 24x zoom
  • SZ-16: 14MP, 24x zoom
  • SZ-15: 16MP, 24x zoom
  • TG-2: rugged, 12MP, 4x zoom
  • TG-630: rugged, 12MP, 5x zoom
  • TG-830: rugged, 16MP, 5x zoom

Panasonic:

  • DMC-TS25 (FT series in Japan), 16.1MP sensor, 4x zoom
  • DMC-TS5 (FT series in Japan), 16.1MP sensor, 4.6x zoom
  • DMC-XS1, 16.1MP sensor, 5x zoom
  • DMC-ZS25 (TZ series in Japan), 16.1MP sensor, 20x zoom
  • DMC-ZS30 (TZ series in Japan), 18.2MP sensor, 20x zoom
  • DMC-LZ30, 16.1MP sensor, 35x zoom
  • DMC-SZ3, 16.1MP sensor, 10x zoom
  • DMC-SZ9, 16.1MP sensor, 10x zoom
  • DMC-F5, 14.1MP sensor, 5x zoom
  • DMC-FH10, 16.1MP sensor, 5x zoom

via digicame-info and via Photorumors.

 

Personal note: Again, I am currently very busy in my private life (baby coming very soon) and I may not answer your mails now. I will use my spare time to work on MFT rumors as new stuff is going to be announced for February! Thanks for your understanding!

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