Fuji X100 in Stock at BHphoto (But Michael Carpentier says the GF1 is a better choice)

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If you are looking to get a Fuji X100 you might take a look at BHphoto (Click here). UPDATE: Now out of Stock :(
There is an interesting note at Amazon US (Click here): “Note on Availability: This item is in high demand and supplies from the manufacturer are limited. Its availability will fluctuate, and if the item is not currently in stock, we cannot guarantee that we will receive additional quantities in a timely manner. We will not charge your credit card until we ship the product.”

P.S.: Photographer Michael Carpentier compared the Fuji X100 and the Panasonic GF1 camera. The original article has been written in french but click here to read the google english translation. You might be surprised to read that he considers the GF1 a better choice than the X100. Image quality difference is minimal, and he is particularly disappointed with the Fuji’s lens performance at f/2.0. There is also a huge problem with focusing at short distance. There are also other quirks with the X100 but also some positive notes. Anyway the small image quality difference in favour of the X100 doesn’t justify the huge price difference. And if you really need that bit more of IQ you can still go for the Sony NEX-5!

To bad the GF1 is out of production. Click those links to see if you can find them at Amazon, Olympus US store, Adorama, B&H, eBay.

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  • I wish the GH2 was in stock

    • Bob B.

      yes….with an X100 sensor!!!!!!!!!!! :-)

  • Bob B.

    Steve Huff has some GREAT suggestions to overcome “some” of the 7 quirks of the X100.
    http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2011/05/11/the-top-7-complaints-of-the-fuji-x100-and-how-i-get-around-them-by-steve-huff
    Me….I am still holding steady with my GF1. I agree with Michael. At some point I believe Panasonic will have a “real” breakthrough with an actually improved sensor. Then I will upgrade to that as a spare camera body and have all of my lenses on hand for a verstil photo kit.
    The quality of the x100 sensor is compelling…but there are just too many caveats for this photographer. Cool camera though. :0

  • JesperMP

    Re “particularly disappointed with the Fuji’s lens performance at f/2.0”:

    It is statements like that, that really really begs for a direct comparison against Panas 20 mm f1.7. I would like to see one.
    He says the X100 is much softer than GF1 at close distances.
    He has only 1 pair of photos to document his claim (the ones at f2.0), and to me it looks as if the X100 is much closer to the subject than the GF1.
    Look at the size of the letter “o”, which seems to be the focus point for both photos.
    Look at the perspective of the spoon to the left.
    —> FAIL !

  • Bidou

    Maybe the google translation is ankward, but m. Carpentier doesn’t say gf1 is better. His only statement about m43 is “think twice before you change your m43 with an x100”

  • Ben

    I’m keeping my GF1. There hasn’t been a better choice offered as of yet.

    • His last sentence conclusion can be possibly translated as “If I wouldnt’ already own a GF1 and the killer 20mm f/1.7 lens, [the X100] would be an heavenly choice. But I wonder if having both cameras is making much sense, the two being so close…”

  • some dude

    My friend with an X100 says battery life is extremely poor. Just an FYI.

    • mat

      I’ve been using one for the past week and though I wouldn’t call the battery life great, extremely poor isn’t accurate. Carry a spare for sure, but it’s hardly a deal killer. And IMHO the X100 is much better ergonomically than the GF1 (which I’ve been using for the past year), at f2 it’s not nearly as bad as some reviewers have suggested, ISO performance is far far better than the GF1, and auto focus as short distances is fine (though having to shift into macro mode is a weakness compared to the GF1). Both the OVF and EVF are much better in use than the GF1.

    • CW

      X100 battery life can vary dramatically depending on your settings. I’ve shot a concert at 250 frames without the indicator dropping below full, followed by 2 more shooting sessions on subsequent days, before the battery gave out. The key is to shoot OVF, auto shutdown after two minutes and don’t chimp. If you really want to see your images right after you shoot, put the image review on 1.5 sec. and they will pop up on the EVF. Even with this feature on, you will get good battery life.

      Also, the reports of slow startup are greatly exaggerated. Place the camera in Quick Start and you will have power in about 1 sec after hitting the shutter to wake the camera.

  • napalm

    here in asia, there are quite a lot of stocks. after the first few weeks of hype, the sales stagnated. for myself, i would just wait for the ‘other’ RF-style cams from the competition and see what they’ll bring. something will come out sooner or later and when that time comes, the x100 price will even go lower if you still want it.

  • When reading these comparisons I keep feeling compelled to point out that the X100 is a fixed-lens camera and the GFs et al are interchangeable-lens cameras.

    Comparing them is a bit like saying a unicycle is better transportation than a car: maybe it is, over a very narrowly-defined range of usage, but you also have to take into account the huge amount of utility you give up… which is why most people who own a unicycle also own a car, but not vice-versa.

    • napalm

      a fixed-lens camera should even perform better than an interchangeable one. this being that the camera is optimized for that lens only, unlike interchangeables that need to cater and adjust to all lenses available.

      so there is that expectation that the X100 should perform better, and based on some feedbacks, it doesnt (in some aspects). i dont think i follow the car vs unicycle bit. which is the unicycle?

  • CW

    As a former GF1 (and E-P2) user, and current X100 user I don’t think it is fair to compare these cameras. One is a system camera with no optical viewfinder (but a rather poor optional EVF) and the other a fixed focal length camera with a nice hybrid viewfinder.

    The image quality is certainly comparable with a good lens combo on the GF1, as long as you don’t want to go past 800 ISO.

    The comments about the X100 being soft at f/2.0 are rubbish and I think we have a case of Internet “telephone” where incorrect information is being distorted and repeated. What is true is that macro mode at f/2.0 is extremely soft on the X100 (dreamy even) but Fuji makes it clear in their marketing materials that macro is meant to be shot at f/4.0 or higher. Anything shot at f/2.0 in normal shooting conditions (non-macro) is nice and sharp.

    Also, the “Huge” AF problem at close distances in not a huge problem and is being completely overblown. It is simply an understandable limitation of the OVF due to focusing parallax and can be overcome by the user learning the AF system and double-checking the distance range. There is no parallax in the EVF or LCD modes.

    The real draw of the X100 is the shooting experience, which the GF1 does not match and doesn’t even try. It is an experience many of us have been clamoring for and Fuji delivered. If the GF1 had the same hybrid viewfinder then I would be hard pressed to jump up to the X100 but as it stands, the X100 appeals more to me, as it does to many others.

    Of course the GF1/GF2 and PEN platforms are awesome system cameras and have a lot to offer. The X100 is just a different, more “traditional” shooting experience that offers higher IQ and better build quality. Going back and looking a similar shots made with the GF1 and X100 I can see a difference – and I can shoot the X100 in low light environments that the GF1 just couldn’t handle (hello, a concert at 6400ISO !!!).

    I understand people like to defend their platform of choice but m4/3 is here to stay and will keep a great many photographers happily clicking for years to come. Let’s welcome the Fuji for what it is, a new and different platform that will also keep photographers happily clicking for years to come.

    • mat

      Exactly.

    • cL

      The review and initial feedback are what I predicted, isn’t it? Lots of people will get disappointed because they’re not the intended users the camera was designed for. Lots of general consumers simply use the camera as a P&S and things like shooting macro in short distance @ f2 is not something a pro photographer would do under normal circumstance. I mean Fuji engineers probably have never thought about tuning the performance under that particular set up. Seriously, really? who shoots macro at close distance, which would make DoF super shallow in the first place and then make it even worse by using f2? You choose large aperture or close distance, but rarely in combination. In low light situation, you don’t shoot macro without ring flash anyways…. Macro photography usually is done with f8 or smaller for good DoF. I have shot mushrooms at f16 and still struggle with not enough DoF, so shooting macro at f2 sounds weird.

      Besides, “minimal” improvement under normal lighting is expected. That sensor is better than m4/3 because it handles high ISO better. That’s it. People who thinks getting x100 will suddenly make photos better is on something…. You can’t get good result with FF either, if all people want is to shoot macro at short distance with aperture wide open…. It’s the technique issue, not camera specific issue. Keep in mind x100 is designed to be a professional’s backup camera. If it is the bugs Thom Hogan was referring to, then I will understand why people think x100 fall short of expectation, but those quirks are not bugs…. Oversight maybe (the camera should auto disable f2 all together when shooting in macro mode when it’s in the hand of amateurs), but not bugs.

    • eee

      good points!

    • bob

      CW and CL- well said.

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