E-PL6 might be released for Japan only.

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Digicaminfo reports that the E-PL6 may be released for Japanese marked only. As reported before the E-PL6 only has few minor improvements over the current E-Pl5. If you argue that this isn’t possible notice that this already happened in the past. A slightly updated E-PL1s was introduced in November 2010. Some of these “Japanese” E-PL1s can be found on eBay (Click here).

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  • AMVR

    What’s with Olympus and bad decisions ? seriously!

    That would be a shame, I really hope they’re not really that dumb, why would they realease a whole new model for 1 single market (yes I know of the PL1s, but that was purely because of the battery regulations in japan) ? We need more details about the PL6 specs to really know if this makes sense or not.

    Are the changes purely aesthetic (like PL1s), or are there new and improved features included too ? And most importantly, if they’re only going to release it in Asia, how are they gonna call the next PL model around the world ? if it’s an exclusive release why not call this one PL5s ? why a whole new model number ? how is that gonna make sense ?

    • @AMVR
      Model numbers don’t mean a great deal to most customer, now if cameras had funky names instead of or as well as model numbers….

      • mahler

        I totally disagree. For most buyers of system cameras, the numbers define the camera line and the model. Most DSLR photographers know exactly, what Canon 5D MK III mean. The same goes for mirrorless system cameras. The only case, where a word means something, is the Canon “Rebel” line, which does not have this denominator in Europe.

        An E-PL6 to most buyers would mean a new model, not just a small improvement. If Olympus would like to introduce a slightly improved E-PL5 to the Japanese market only, they better name it E-PL5s.

        Model codes and numbering are very important for marketing and should be done in an understandable, non-confusing manor. Panasonic has shown how not to do it, when creating a lot of confusion with its GF line, where the GF2 and followers, where not accepted as successors of GF1.

        The same can be said to the transition of the G2 to the G3, and from GH2 to GH3, where product successions aren’t convincingly transported by the numbering.

        • @mahler
          most consumers I know and speak to just mention the brand they own, very rarely the model number.Though this changes the higher the consumer chain you go….
          I feel camera makers often do better when they introduce new lines as opposed to model numbers…

          • I suppose we all move in different circles.

  • Anonymous

    IIRC, the E-PL1s had two main things, the faster focusing that showed up in the E-PL2, and the replacement of the BLS-5 battery with the BLS-1. It may have been the first white model camera, that seems more popular in Japan, but I might be mis-remembering.

    Given there was a new Japanese standard that went into effect at the time that mandated better protections against battery overcharge (which is in the BLS-5, and also the BLM-5 introduced with the E-5), I suspect that may have been the reason the E-PL1s came out.

    In terms of the battery, I think the Kyoto earthquake came out after the E-PL2 started shipping, and people were noticing the US versions of the E-PL2 had gone back to the BLS-1 batteries. Presumably this was a supply issue and there weren’t enough BLS-5’s at the time. Olympus needed to sell the BLS-5 in the Japanese market, and concentrated their supply there.

    There was also the E-400, which was the last of the Kodak sensor cameras, and it was Europe only. I think it was around the time Kodak announced they were stopping production of the sensor, and it may have been Olympus only had so many parts, and could get no more.

    The E-600, which was a stripped down E-620, only appeared in certain big box stores, for a limited time.

    • We had also E-P2 in silver for only Japanese market on same time, maybe also same battery reason.

    • E-PL1s also had maximum ISO of 6400 as opposed to E-PL1’s ISO 3200.

  • Cheetos

    If it is just a few minor improvement, then I don’t think it matters too much. The EPL5 is already a great camera and it is getting cheaper everyday.

  • Michael Meissner

    IIRC, the E-PL1s had two main things, the faster focusing that showed up in the E-PL2, and the replacement of the BLS-5 battery with the BLS-1. It may have been the first white model camera, that seems more popular in Japan, but I might be mis-remembering.

    Given there was a new Japanese standard that went into effect at the time that mandated better protections against battery overcharge (which is in the BLS-5, and also the BLM-5 introduced with the E-5), I suspect that may have been the reason the E-PL1s came out.

    In terms of the battery, I think the Kyoto earthquake came out after the E-PL2 started shipping, and people were noticing the US versions of the E-PL2 had gone back to the BLS-1 batteries. Presumably this was a supply issue and there weren’t enough BLS-5’s at the time. Olympus needed to sell the BLS-5 in the Japanese market, and concentrated their supply there.

    There was also the E-400, which was the last of the Kodak sensor cameras, and it was Europe only. I think it was around the time Kodak announced they were stopping production of the sensor, and it may have been Olympus only had so many parts, and could get no more.

    The E-600, which was a stripped down E-620, only appeared in certain big box stores, for a limited time.

    • AMVR

      That’s what I meant, in all of those instances Oly altered the model number, they either went back in the numbering or just acknowledged the new slightly different cameras as direct replacements and not truly successors by adding the ¨s¨. This time they’re jumping a whole generation numbering just for one market and a few improvements ? Something is not right.

      Either this is going to be a PL5s like the PL1s and be a japan exclusive or the exclusivity rumor is wrong and they’re really introducing a decent update to the PL5 as a PL6.

      • Anonymous

        Samsung recently released the NX1100 in North America only. It’s almost identical to the previous NX1000, except it has improved WiFi and comes bundled with Lightroom. Samsung didn’t even announce the camera themselves (it was done by B&H), and still haven’t got a product page for it on their website. Sometimes these companies do strange things.

  • This could mean the E-PL7 has very big improvements

    • AMVR

      Is this ironic or typo ? What do you mean E-PL7 ? Even if there truly is a PL6 in the works right now, the PL7 is a loooong way from being announced, probably more than a year from now.

      • true homer

        What makes you think that? The epl6 is coming out about 6 months after the epl5, so the epl7 should be here byxmas

  • Andrew

    Admin what’s the latest you’ve heard about the Oly fast zoom and a new OM-D model? Will either be coming this year?

    • Anonymous

      The OM-D was released in April 2012 – that is just over a year ago – I highly doubt it will replaced for at least another six months. Even if it is updated it will likely be just to add new features like WiFi and GPS, not to bring in any amazing jumps in sensor tech.

      • If its a “pro” model, it wont be the successor of the E-M5.

    • A new E-M6? This september!

  • Like I said all along, of course there won’t be an E-pl6.

    Simple logic usually goes a long way. This is an E-pl5s.

  • Farrukh

    Admin, any news on the EP5 video specs?

  • Hm

    Olympus should release a camera type G1X-style LF1 with 4/3 sensor aa filter less.

  • Anonymous

    are you saying I won’t be able to buy it from Japan via eBay?

    • Ross

      It might have only one language loaded in it, Japanese. 😉

      • lorenzaccio

        I don’t think so. So far all Olympus cameras were multi-language, as opposed to Sony and Panasonic which produce distinct products for Japan and “rest-of-the-world”.
        This would be the first Japanese-menu-only Olympus camera. Naaah

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